Tui Bulb Food

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Available in: 1.5kg

Tulips, daffodils, hyacinths or freesias - whatever your bloom of choice may be, filling your piece of paradise with fragrant floral displays will bring joy on a daily basis. Tui Bulb Food is blended with all the necessary nutrients, including calcium, to stimulate maximum flowering and healthy bulb growth. Suitable to use for all varieties of flowering bulbs.

Use in your garden beds, and watch your bulbs reach their flowering potential before your eyes.

N-P-K  2-5-6 + S, Ca, Mg & trace elements.

Benefits

  • Replenishes nutrients to encourage healthy growth.
  • Suitable for all varieties of flowering bulbs.

Directions for use

When planting:

  • Prior to planting apply 200g (approx.2/3 cup) per square metre of garden.
  • Mix thoroughly into the soil.
  • Water in well after application.

Established plants:

  • Apply 100g (approx. 1/3 cup) persquare metre of garden, around the base of the plant.
  • Water in well after application, taking care to wash any product off the plant foliage.

Not recommended for use in containers or pots.

Tui Tip

 

  • Feed your bulbs when planting, when stems begin to appear, when starting to flower and when dying down.

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